Category Archives: Techniques

Artist Inspiration : Steven Spazuk

I’d never heard of the Art technique “Fumage”, or even thought there was such a thing, until I came across the work of Steven Spazuk.

W.O.W. Soots you, Sir! ;)

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Here is the link to Steven Spazuk’s website, where you can marvel at more of his wonderful creations:
http://www.spazuk.com/fr/home-spazuk.php

This is Steven’s Artist Statement, taken verbatim from his website above:

For the past 14 years, Spazuk has perfected a technique called fumage, that allows him to use the flame of a candle or the flame of a torch as a pencil to create his paintings with trails of soot. Using various tools, he intuitively sculpt the plumes of soot left behind in response to the shapes that appear on the canvas.

Spontaneity and chance are the heart and soul of his creative process. He does not censor. He does not direct. Spazuk opens himself to the experience. This in-the-moment creative practice coupled with the fluidity of the soot, creates a torrent of images, shadows and light. Fuelled by the quest of a perfect shape that has yet to materialize, he concentrate in a meditative act and surrender to capture the immediacy of the moment on canvas.

The human body fascinates him. Bodies in a perpetual metamorphosis are the language with which he express his thoughts on the human condition: emotions, opinions, stories that are born of his uncensored psyche. Spazuk often works piece by piece, collecting a multitude of unique elements that he assembles into mosaics. Entities that, once grouped together, afford a different meaning and provide a new perspective that is both novel and complementary. He sees fragments of things, events, people, as a powerful metaphor of modern life and, even more so, of the way we perceive things through our senses and our minds. His work expresses how every one of us is a constituent fragment of the human community.

Steven Spazuk isn’t shy about sharing his unique techniques with the rest of the world. He has a YouTube channel, where he demonstrates how he creates his images. Anyone can try their hand at Fumage, but for those at home, please be mindful of the dangers of fire, especially around drapes and paper. Whilst Steven Spazuk has taken his artform to a higher level in the modern world, we must also pause to reflect that in reality the art of Fumage goes back to the dawn of Mankind, to the original soot paintings on the walls of prehistoric caves. And thus, when we view any of Spazuk’s works with this in mind, we can then fully appreciate the beautiful folding of Time.

Here’s my favourite video of Steven Spazuk at work, titled “Fire Painter“.

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Artist Inspiration : Jacek Yerka

A picture tells a thousand words. The artist here is Jacek Yerka. He may be from Poland, but his imagination is out of this world. I’m a huge fan of Surrealism, and Jacek Yerka delivers in spades.

Here’s the link to Jacek’s website: Jacek Yerka. To read about his background and artist statement, click on this link.

Now relax, and feast your eyes, and let your wildest imagination run amok amongst Jacek’s mindblowing creations. (Some of these remind me of Hayao Miyazaki‘s Anime films, such as Laputa Castle In The Sky, My Neighbour Totoro, Kiki’s Delivery Service and Howl’s Moving Castle, with their strange creatures, weird trees and beast/machine hybrids).

Jacek even merits his own Wikipedia entry:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacek_Yerka

These are just some of my favourites, the artist is very prolific, and an Image search on Google will show you many, many more amazing and astonishing works by Jacek Yerka. For those on a stretched budget, you can buy his calenders on Amazon; now That would be an affordable way to own some of his Art.

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Australian Aboriginal Artists : Tarisse and Sarrita King

Tarisse and Sarrita King are sisters, Tarisse was born in 1986, Sarrita in 1988. Their father was a prominent Aboriginal artist himself, William King Jungala(1966-2007).

On Tarisse King: (from Kate Owen‘s Gallery site):

Tarisse is a daughter of well-known artist, William King Jungala. An urban Aboriginal artist, she was born on September 4th 1986 in Adelaide. She moved to Darwin to live with her mother at the age of nine, but returned to Adelaide in 2003 to pursue a career in hospitality. However, living with her father she was exposed to art and her engagement with it grew. She began painting her father’s stories including his five elements, earth images and other designs, which she learned and inherited from William, and as her involvement grew she began experimenting with her own techniques and designs.

Following her father’s passing in 2007, she continues to spend much of her time in the studio, alongside her sister Sarrita, who is also an emerging artist carrying their father’s legacy.

I found Sarrita King’s Facebook page, where she provides details about her life, what inspires her to create Aboriginal Art, and a list of exhibitions. Here’s an excerpt from her profile page:

Sarrita King was born in Adelaide, South Australia on the 5th March 1988. She is the younger sister to fellow artist, Tarisse King and daughter to the late highly regarded artist, William King Jungala (1966 – 2007).

Sarrita inherits her Australian Aboriginality from her father who was part of the Gurindji tribe from the Northern Territory. The Gurindji tribe came to public attention during the 1960s and 1970s when members employed by the Wave Hill cattle station led a landmark case which became the first successful land rights claim in Australia. It is this same strong sense of self and pride that Sarrita embodies and it fuels her drive to paint her totemic landscape.

Sarrita spent most of her youth growing up in Darwin in the Northern Territory. Not far from where her ancestors inhabited, it is here that her connection to her Aboriginality and subsequently the land was able to grow. Her exposure to the imperious weather and extreme landscape has provided the theme for her works of art, since she began painting at age 16. Rolling sand hills, cracking lightning and thunderstorms, torrential rain, fire, desert and tangled bush are all scathing environmental factors that shaped her forefather’s lives and also her own. Depicting these elements in her paintings, Sarrita provides a visual articulation of the earth’s language.

Stylistically, Sarrita utilises traditional Aboriginal techniques such as ‘dotting’ but also incorporates unorthodox techniques inherited from her late father, as well as self-developed practices. Her art is a fusion of the past, present and future and represents the next generation of artists who have been influenced by both their indigenous history, and current Western upbringing. Sarrita creates frenetic energy on the canvas with her Lightning series and searing heat with her Fire series. Her aesthetic has a universal appeal and provides an entry point for people to experience the power and uniqueness of the Australian landscape and its harsh climate. On a world scale, her depictions couldn’t be more seasonable and well-timed.

Sarrita now paints in Adelaide in a shared studio with her sister. She has been included in over 20 exhibitions, is represented in galleries in every Australian state, included in many high profile Australian and international art collections and been auctioned several times successfully through Paris’ Art Curial Auction house.
Sarrita is currently taking a hiatus from her Bachelor of Journalism at the University of South Australia to pursue her interest in digital media, specifically documentary making and focus on her art. Only at the age of 22, Sarrita King has many personal achievements but it is her desire to visually communicate her inspiration, the land, which keeps her ancestral narrative alive and provides a new way of looking back while looking forward.

I believe the information on both sisters may be out of date. Tarisse’s Facebook page indicates she is currently living in New Zealand. Whatever the case may be, the King sisters continue to collaborate on projects, as well as painting in their own distinctive styles.

Here are some examples of Tarisse King’s work: (Google Images)

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Here are some examples of Sarrita King’s work: (Google Images)

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Artist Inspiration : Yossi Kotler

The exuberant, vibrant artwork of Israeli artist Yossi Kotler jumped off the page at me. Well, it jumped off Saatchi Art’s screen onto my retina, screaming “Look at me! I’m so beautiful, you Have to share me with your readers!!”

And so here we are. Here’s the link to Saatchi Art’s page on this very talented artist, Yossi Kotler: http://www.saatchiart.com/yossikotlerart

And here’s a transcript from that page, in Yossi’s own words:

About Yossi Kotler
hello my name is yossi kotler i am an artist and a designer. graduated “wizo college of design” in haifa israel in graphic design, in the years 1988 – 1992. i have worked in the field of visual design as acreative director. i have achieved many awards in graphic and product design. some of my art work are in a private collections. i love to work with acrylic on canvas, oil pastel,ink,charcoal, computer- i love to make digital art as well. i get inspired by the internet and by the life around me. my artworks are very colorful and strong with allot of layers. i don’t thinks that i have one style because i am exploring all the time different style. i can be very accurate in the details and very free. it’s depend in what i want to achieve.

Education:
i cam to this world with unlimited ability of creativity and inspiration. i am drawing and painting and sculpturing since i was a kid .
graduated “wizo college of design” in Haifa Israel in graphic design, in the years 1988 – 1992.
i am a full time artists and a brand designer work in my studio.
using my creativity in many ways.

Events:
2003 – package design competition in Israel- first place award in the cosmetic & toiletry category.
2004 – package design competition in Israel- first place award in the cosmetic & toiletry category.
2005 – package design competition in Israel- first place award in the cosmetic & toiletry category.
2006 – package design competition in Israel- first place award in the cosmetic & toiletry category.
2007 – package design competition in Israel- first place award in the cosmetic & toiletry category.
2009 – package design competition in Israel- first place award in the cosmetic & toiletry category.

Exhibitions:
group exhibition- March 2013 in Tel Aviv

Just so you know what the fuss is all about, try some of Yossi’s works out for size here: (images curated from Saatchi Art and Google Images)

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You can also purchase Yossi’s artwork directly from the artist himself, from his Etsy shop.

Artist Inspiration : Larry Carlson

Unless you’ve been living under a coconut shell, chances are you would have at some time come across the psychedelic work of Larry Carlson. Yes…THAT artist who makes your brain go all trippy. Oh, and have you heard his music? Surreal is an understatement. Collages done the traditional, good old-fashioned way? Check! Digital photographic art? Check! Larry is a veritable powerhouse of creativity, as you will find out.

Here’s what Larry says about his art on his own site:

G4Tech TV called him “The Salvador Dali of the Next Century”, and High Times magazine labeled him an “Artistic Mastermind”. Larry Carlson is a legendary visionary  artist who utilizes a vast range of mediums to create mind boggling art that will make you think twice about how you see the world. He is a modern day renaissance man with revolutionary work that pushes the possibilities for consciousness exploration within contemporary art. Few artists can rival him in terms of innovation, vision, talent, and high-yield experimentation.
His work spans a variety of forms including photography, film making, web-art, collage painting, digital art, animation, video-art, text-art, and sound design. What ever art form he’s working in Carlson’s greatest strength is in artfully depicting the mystical dimensions of consciousness, coaxing us into sweet spiritualized epiphanies one moment then plunging us into completely bizarre surreal frenzies the next. His artwork fuses together aspects of mysticism, surrealism, psychedelia and the technological resulting in sublime juxtapositions that can totally bend one’s perception.
A pioneer in experimental multimedia web-art, he first started exhibiting his artwork online in 1997. In 2000 Carlson published the legendary art web sites Virtual OM and LarryCarlson.com which featured his original full screen psychotropic entertainment.
Larry Carlson has been featured in magazines like Vice, Juxtapoz, High Times, Cracked, NY Arts, Beautiful/Decay, and US weekly. International newspapers like Montreal’s Mirror, Istanbul’s Vatan News, and London’s Guardian, have done features on his unique awe-inspiring art.
He has exhibited his collage artwork, digital photo artwork, and video art in the U.S., Japan, Canada, Sweden, Brazil, France, the U.K.,  India, and Germany. The Museum of Modern Art in New York City exhibited some of his handmade collage art books in the show Book/Shelf. His movies have been screened at  The Paço das Artes Museum in San Palo, Brazil, the Brattle Theater in Boston, Alex Grey’s COSM gallery in New York City,  A.T.A. in San Francisco, and other galleries and theaters around the world.
Larry Carlson creates his own original music and soundtracks and so far has released eight albums. In 2008, Portland, Oregon’s KBOO 90.7 fm hosted two Larry Carlson music specials featuring his surreal soundtracks.
Larry Carlson graduated from Cooper Union School of Art in New York City, where he studied painting and video-art. He currently lives and works in his studio in the green mountains of Vermont.

It’s worth checking out Larry’s site, which is very comprehensive and contains a plethora of examples of his work, all neatly categorised. Here are just a few of my favourite ones:

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What interests me most about Any Artist’s work is their process, techniques and workflow, and also what goes on inside their heads. Luckily for us all, Larry is very forthcoming in this regard, and his site even has a Frequently Asked Questions section, which I quote verbatim here for your convenience:

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

(taken verbatim from http://www.larrycarlson.com)

What is your process for making the images?

Sometimes I see a clear vision in my mind’s eye of the image I want to make and then I set out and take the photos and do the  computer effects to make it happen. Most of the time I just experiment and have fun with combinations of filters, images, and 3-D rendering. I do a lot of the work with the image editing program Photoshop. I also use 3-D rendering programs to make computer generated objects and settings to use in my work.

I always have a lot of unfinished works on my hard drive that I work on for a while and then put away until the inspiration hits me to work on it again. So most of my finished pieces are the result of months of on and off work. I follow my own vision and try to make something new everyday. Even if I dont feel like working, I still work on my art daily, because it helps me stay focused and continue to make new fresh work.

I am mostly left-handed and use an electronic pen on a tablet to actually draw and paint on my digital images. Sometimes I also use a mouse with my right hand at the same time.

As well as using computers to make images I also make old fashion cut and paste collages. This really influences the style of my digital work, as it helps me use Photoshop in a “real hands on” way, and not be dependent on digital effects only. I strive to have my work describe life as positive, elusive, and rich with wonder and possibility.

What inspires your work?

I let intuition and improvisation be the main guiding forces in the creation of my art. Many of the ideas for my art come to me in dreams and visions, so i spend a lot of time cultivating a mystical state of mind. I often go out in nature, hiking, camping and taking photos, being a part of the mother nature system has a deep influence on my work.

Do you take your own photos?

Yes. I take photos with a digital camera that I use in my work. Sometimes I do shoots in a studio, other times I take shots outdoors. I retouch, fix up, composite, and alter the photos in Photoshop. In the city or up in the mountains, its always an adventure getting new shots to use in my work.

How do you create your collage artwork?

With glue and scissors, I take a tiny little bit of something from a piece and put it together with a lot of other pieces and make a distinct whole. The result is a juxtaposition of the familiar and the fantastical. I hunt for old books and magazines for material to use and I print out images from the computer. I cut and splice these samples into new formations that reconstruct culturally constructed meaning of the original samples, opening up the images to a multiplicity of interpretations. I am inspired by the infinite permutations of visual images which parallel the infinite nature of the imagination.

How do you make the soundtracks?

Like my visual artwork it’s a collage process. I make my soundtracks by mixing and processing sound samples on the computer. I use several different sound programs to put the tracks together. I collage samples from everywhere and anywhere, the TV, the web, radio, phone messages, you-tube videos, turntables and musical instruments. Sometimes I use programs to generate sounds to mix in the work. I also play around with the KORG MS2000, a really cool Pink Floydish sounding synthesizer.I even like to mix in sounds I get from an ol’ school ATARI 2600 console. All my soundtracks are available as a free mp3 downloads. And I have a SoundCloud music page and an iLike music fan page.

Where do you exhibit your work?

I show different forms of art, like interactive web sites art, video installations, large high quality prints of digital art, collage paintings and handmade collage books. Recently my movies were presented at Alex Grey’s COSM gallery, and were publicly displayed on a pair of outdoor video screens at Harvard. Last year, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City showed some collage art books I collaborated on in the show Book/Shelf. In 2002, The Paço das Artes Museum in San Palo Brazil exhibited a version of my web site LARRYCARLSON.COM projected on a wall in a gallery where visitors could interact with it. In Stockholm, Sweden, Galleri Loyal has exhibited my collage paintings. My movies have been screened in festivals around the world in places like New York City, Austin,Texas, France, Canada and Germany. And I have had many exhibitions of my digital images at festivals and shows around the world.

How do you do your live VJ shows?

Basically I mix a collage of videos and animations in much the same way that DJs mix records. The techniques and equipment are different then a DJ, but the basic principles are the same (eg selecting, cross fading, scratching, cutting, sampling to the rhythm). I burn my own custom made DVDs and much of my VJing now is me mixing content on several DVD players through a video mixer device to the rhythm of the music. As well as the DVD players I also use a VJ software program to mix and manipulate digital video clips. In the past I have played live on tour with musical groups like The Kottonmouth Kings, and at major electronic music events.

How and when did you get into computers?

My early experiences with computers begin when I was a kid, messing with the old Commodore 64 home computer. Later on in college I did a big experimental video collage piece with the Amiga video editing system as well as experiments with Adobe Premiere. I spent a lot of time creating digital images with Photoshop. During this time i started making music with the computer and more then any thing I wanted people too see this cool stuff, so publishing on the net became a must. I quickly learned how to make web pages and my early web sites were online galleries of my digital images. So by the time Flash came out , I was ready to really rock the system! After having spent years of exploring so many different fields of computer art, now its all kind of melting together into one “multimedia” experience.

Did you go to school to learn how to do this?

I  graduated from Cooper Union School of Art in New York City, where I studied painting and video-art. A lot of the artwork I do now, I learned on my own. I love learning new programs and experimenting with them to make something new.

How can people stay updated on what your doing?

I am active on TumblrFacebook and Twitter and post new work there often. Connect, add your feedback, and stay updated on new work that is posted daily.

 

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WordPress Sent Me This

This is WordPress’s Yearly Report which was emailed to me on New Year’s Day. Click on the link below and be transported to a magical wonderland! 😄

http://alyzenmoonshadow.com/2014/annual-report/

Interesting reading, and good to know which posts were the most popular, and which days were the best for capturing viewers. (I let them go again, of course, after capturing them, poor little hummingbirds). After a solid 365 days of continuous blogging every single day, (give or take a few mishaps with time zones and accidental deletions), here’s what I’ve learnt:

1) it takes months to raise your profile. My viewer stats jumped from the low dozens to over 100 after 6 months of consistent blogging. It’s levelled off now at around 80 a day. I must be making the coffee right. I need to work on my cupcakes, I think…then perhaps my blog will get read daily by thousands of people around the world, not just a hundred. If that happens, I shall blame my mouthwateringly delicious, yummy, moreish cupcakes. And run out to the shops for more eggs, milk, sugar and flour.

2) don’t ask me how some bloggers can post up one simple photo without even a caption, and get viewed over 30000 times immediately. I don’t know how and that has never happened to me. I think I would faint if it did. Besides, a good image always deserves a good caption, the punnier the better.

3) also, don’t ask me how bloggers get into the golden circle of Blog Awards. I have never been invited and I don’t think I swim in the same ocean as these super bloggers. I’m a squid. I write with ink.

4) blog readers have busy lives too, so on weekends and public holidays, expect to see your viewer stats take a nosedive. Unless you’re Santa Claus writing from the North Pole, of course. Then I’m afraid your busiest times will be from September to December, but you might as well go surfing the rest of the year. I hear Western Australia has excellent beaches.

5) it’s always fun to plunder Google Images and Pinterest for a compilation of cute, artistic, unusual or funny images that you can curate and present on a different platter. YouTube throws up some video gems too, sometimes. Other times it just throws up.

6) try to link up your Social Media sites to automatically share your award-winning writing with everyone you can think of. But be careful when connecting the dots, don’t overdo it. One mistake I made was linking up too many sites so that my posts ended up pinging off each other and triplicating all over the place, like Triffids. I was never good at programming electronic circuitry.

7) always try to have an image or more in your blog posts. This really helps when sharing your post to other sites, as many Social Media sites like to use images to pull in the punters, so to speak. A hook to hang your hat on, in other words.

8) I seem to have picked up a penchant for making lists. Yay, me!

And here is today’s token image, courtesy of Google Images:
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Cymatics

Awesome video! And based on fact, not fiction. Science meets Music meets WOW!

http://youtu.be/Q3oItpVa9fs

Cymatics is the study of visible sound. It was first pioneered by Dr Hans Jenny, a Swiss scientist. Today there are a growing number of fans and proponents of this fascinating new(ish) genre in music. Nigel Stanford is an electronic musician based in New Zealand, who specialises in trance and ambient music. The video above of Nigel’s, which I first saw on a friend’s Facebook wall, ably demonstrates the physical manifestation of music. Also remember to check out and download Nigel’s other tracks.

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Here’s Wikipedia’s definition of Cymatics:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cymatics

Cymatics is exciting, as it is happening Right Now. And it continues to be researched and developed by different people from different walks of life, each with an aim of their own – scientists, mathematicians, visual artists, musicians. And when everything comes together, that’s when pure Magic happens.

Happy Christmas, everyone! May 2015 bring all your dreams and aspirations to fruition.

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Artist Inspiration : Loui Jover

Loui Jover was born in April 1967 in Europe, but migrated to Australia with his family at a young age. He’s based in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Loui works with ink and gouache, drawing over vintage papers, books and music manuscript. He loves using collaged paper items and old printed stock. I’m a big fan of collaged art myself, perhaps that’s why I find Loui’s work so appealing. His favourite subjects are women, specifically their faces, and he utilises the pages of vintage books as his backgrounds to convey a sense of fragility. He also paints other subjects, romantic ones such as lovers embracing or walking under umbrellas in the rain. I love his black and white ink dripping paintings, which are reminiscent of the work of graffiti artist Banksy. I also love Loui’s super-colourful, super-saturated works.

Here are some write-ups about Loui Jover’s art, which make for interesting reading:

http://www.galleryview.com.au/2013/09/07/profile-australian-artist-loui-jover/

http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/loui-jover-ink-drawings

http://www.zoneonearts.com.au/2014-01-13-loui-jover.htm

As for me, I just want to immerse myself in Loui’s fantastic artwork. And perhaps be able to buy some of his art through Saatchi Art Online, where he is a featured artist.

Meanwhile, enjoy these examples of Loui Jover’s art, which I’ve pulled from Google.

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I want them all!!

Artist Inspiration : Terry Jackson

Teresa “Terry” Jackson currently lives nowhere and everywhere, on the Seven Seas, a boat travelling around the great big continent of Australia.

In Terry’s own words, from this site:
“I’m a self taught wildlife artist from beautiful South Australia. I began drawing in 2005 and never really stopped. My favourite medium is graphite but I also work in soft pastel and coloured pencil”.

This amazing artist’s favoured medium is a graphite pencil. Sometime using just ONE single pencil, and hours of intense concentration, mixed in with a whole lot of love for wildlife, Terry creates wonderfully detailed photorealistic drawings such as these:

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“Pride and Joy” by Terry Jackson

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“Tiger” by Terry Jackson

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“Feeling a little cocky” by Terry Jackson

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“Dos Lobos” by Terry Jackson

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“Tanklet” by Terry Jackson

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“Nice Scarf!” by Terry Jackson

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“Oh hey!” by Terry Jackson. Graphite and pastels.

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“Zac” by Terry Jackson. Pastels. Commissioned work.

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“Owl Whisperer” by Terry Jackson. Graphite and pastels. Wild Whimsy series.

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“What a Galah!” by Terry Jackson. Wild Colour Series.

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“Fennec Fox” by Terry Jackson. Wild Colour Series.

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“Mouse Opposum” by Terry Jackson. Wild Colour Series.

Just amazing!! Check out Terry’s website Drawn Wild, where you can find out more information about her, including where to buy prints of her truly amazing work.

My favourite artist Lenormand deck

I just received in the post what has to be my favourite Lenormand deck. This one’s by Lauren Forestell and it’s aptly called the “Destroyed Dondorf”. The Dondorf design is perhaps the most recognisable design of all traditional Lenormand cards. It is readily available online through the usual suspects, and there are many variants of it as well.

Lauren’s story on how the”Destroyed Dondorf”, or, more precisely “Le Fanu’s Destroyed Dondorf” came to be is intriguing. Basically, a tatty old deck of Dondorf Lenormand cards fell into the hands of a chap called Le Fanu, who then showed it to Lauren, who then proceeded to restore the cards digitally. Read about it on Le Fanu’s blog My Curious Cabinet.

I have taken some photos of my newest acquisition, for posterity. They really are the most intriguing, meaningful and enchanting deck of Lenormand cards I own. I’m inspired to create my own tattered well-worn deck, which should be fun, as I’m a big afficionado of grunge and texture in my own artistic endeavours.

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